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NPR 4 THE DEAF: We Hear It Even When You Can’t

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FRESH AIR: In 1927, the U.S. Supreme Court decided, by a vote of 8 to 1, to uphold a state’s right to forcibly sterilize a person considered unfit to procreate. The case, known as Buck v. Bell, centered on a young woman named Carrie Buck, whom the state of Virginia had deemed to be “feebleminded.” Author Adam Cohen tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross that Buck v. Bell was considered a victory for America’s eugenics movement, an early 20th century school of thought that emphasized biological determinism and actively sought to “breed out” traits that were considered undesirable. “There were all kinds of categories of people who were deemed to be unfit [to procreate],” Cohen mb copysays. “The eugenicists looked at evolution and survival of the fittest, as Darwin was describing it, and they believed ‘We can help nature along, if we just plan who reproduces and who doesn’t reproduce.’ ” All told, as many as 70,000 Americans were forcibly sterilized during the 20th century. The victims of state-mandated sterilization included people like Buck who had been labeled “mentally deficient,” as well as those who who were deaf, blind and diseased. Minorities, poor people and “promiscuous” women were often targeted. Cohen’s new book about the Buck case, Imbeciles, takes its name from the terms eugenicists used to categorize the “feebleminded.” In it, he revisits the Buck v. Bell ruling and explores the connection between the American eugenics movement and the rise of the Nazi party in Germany. Cohen notes that the instinct to “demonize” people who are different is still prevalent in the U.S. today, particularly in the debate over immigration. “I think these instincts to say that we need to stop these other people from ‘polluting us,’ from changing the nature of our country, they’re very real,” Cohen warns. “The idea that those who don’t remember the past are condemned to repeat it — it’s very troubling that we don’t remember this past.” MORE

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